Monday, November 14, 2016

How to Earn the Daisy Girl Scout Count It Up Leaf

The third Daisy leaf in the quartet the girls can earn is called Count It Up. This can be done at the start of cookie selling season. Although I am not a fan of first year leaders selling cookies, if you are going to, start by reading this blog post on 10 Girl Scout Cookie Selling Tips for New Leaders.

Here is how your troop can earn the Daisy Girl Scout Count It Up Leaf.


How to Earn the Daisy Girl Scout Count It Up Leaf-Complete Meeting Plans

Photo by Hannah Gold

Step 1 Find Out What Cookies Cost

Depending on where you live, Girl Scout cookies cost $4.00 or $5.00 a box. How many one dollar bills is that? If someone gives you a $5.00 bill, how much change should s/he get back?

Step 2 Learn About the Different Kinds of Cookies

Here is an opportunity for a taste testing party (of course, if there are allergies, you will either have to skip this or make sure that child/children does not eat something she shouldn't).  This also does not mean that you have to open one of every flavor, maybe one or two of the classics and one of the newest flavor to join the cookie family.


How to Earn the Daisy Girl Scout Count It Up Leaf-Complete Meeting Plan
Photo Collage by Hannah Gold

On my Girl Scout Cookie Selling Ideas Pinterest board, there are a few games that you can make (if you want) to help the girls learn about the cookies they will be selling. 

Step 3 Set Sales Goals

Materials
  • Posterboard
  • Markers
Before the meeting, make a large thermometer on a piece of posterboard and entitle it "Troop 12345's Cookie Goals". This is a TROOP GOAL POSTER and not to be an individual girl poster. Cookie season brings out the worst in leaders. Troop money is troop money and if you do not believe me, it is written on page 21 in the official Girl Scouts Blue Book.

Cookie selling is voluntary and I wrote about it in depth in this blog post on my main Girl Scout leader site and in this post on my Daisy blog.

Talk to your girls about how many boxes they want to sell as a troop. Are they realistic? Young children really do not have a strong concept of numbers that are large, or even small for that matter. It is hard for them to visualize the difference between 100 and 1000. You may want to bring in some kind of visual, like a bag of beans or math chips, to demonstrate the difference.

You may want to make incremental goals with a small reward as you go up the chart. For example, at the 100 box mark you may want to give them a special sticker or a small, edible treat. While not necessary, it does give little girls a reward for the work they are doing.

No comments:

Post a Comment